The RV Podcast

In this episode of Roadtreking the RV Podcast we meet a newbie RVer named Shane Pena, whose first journey was one to remember, a cross-country trip that saw him having to outrun a tornado, among other adventures. Jennifer and I tell of our experience last week battling 103 degree heat without air conditioning as we travel with their dog, Bo. And we have lots of traveling tips, RV news and a fun off the beaten path report.

Scroll down for show note details and resources and click the player below to start listening. When you see a time code hyperlink, you can click it to jump directly to that segment of the podcast.

Show Notes for Episode #94, June 29, 2016 of Roadtreking - The RV Lifestyle Podcast:

In this episode of Roadtreking the RV Podcast we meet a newbie RVer named Shane Pena, whose first journey was one to remember, a cross-country trip that saw him having to outrun a tornado, among other adventures. Jennifer and I tell of our experience last week battling 103 degree heat without air conditioning as we travel with their dog, Bo. And we have lots of traveling tips, RV news and a fun off the beaten path report.

Show Notes for Episode #94, June 29, 2016 of Roadtreking - The RV Lifestyle Podcast:

JENNIFER'S TIP OF THE WEEK

As we’ve been traveling around this summer, I’ve started asking the folks we meet at campgrounds and while boondocking to tell me one of their favorite tips, something they have discovered to make thngs a little easier or more efficient.

Well, during our Smoky Mountains gathering last week we were all noting that, camped in the woods like we were, there were lots of bugs and mosquitos. Andrea Barker, who was camped a coupe spots down from us, said she had particularly been bothered by bugs that were biting her ankles.

But she said she solved that problem…using something intended for something else. Her bug fighting tip has to do with those Coozis people use to keep beer or cans of soft drink cold.

The tip of the week is brought to you by Good Sam, the world's most popular RV organization, now celebrating its 50th year.

LISTENER QUESTIONS OF THE WEEK:

Listener Bill asks for Mikes recommendation for a surge protector.

-       Mike explains that newer Roadtreks have them built in. Older ones, though, do not. Surge protectors are expensive. But bad power from a campground pedestal can sure wreak havoc in a motorhome. The one Mike recommends is the Progressive Industries PT30C 30 Amp Portable Electrical Management System. It costs $237. Class A’s would need a 50 Amp unit.

RVing newbies Nick and Jeanette wanted to know how they can find out the tire inflation they need for their RV.

Mike says read the recommended tire inflation tag inside the driver’s side post.

Sponsoring this part of the podcast is Van City RV in St. Louis, and their Partner Dealerships Creston RV in Kalispell, Montana, and Wagon Trail RV in Las Vegas. Bringing You the largest Inventory of class B’s from three locations.

RV BASIC TRAINING

Why you need a Dash Cam

Here’s a link to the info Mike shared on why RVers will want to use a dash cam - http://roadtreking.com/windshieldwitness/

This part of the podcast is brought to you by Campers Inn, the nation’s largest family-operated RV dealership with 15 locations on the East Coast 

RV NEWS OF THE WEEK:

RV Care-A-Vanners build homes for Habitat for Humanity

RVs in Marin County CA prompting community outrage

Dutchman buys Closed Evergreen plan in Elkhart

This portion of the podcast is brought to you by Alde  the only name in heat that you need to know for your RV

TRAVELING TECH TIP:

Verizon's Steve Van Dinter reports on three gadgets that travelers can use to keep track of pets, property and help you control what’s going on back at your sticks and bricks house.

Summer is a busy time of year for everyone. And sometimes that means forgetting where you’ve placed a much-needed item or losing touch with what’s at home when you’re on the road.

Verizon has some great summer gadgets that are all under $100 that can bring about priceless piece of mind.

First up Tile – this is a small Bluetooth chip that lets you find your missing key chain, golf bag, back pack, wallet or purse. Using an app on your smartphone you just click on what you’re trying to find and it will play a tune loudly. Or, if your smartphone is what's missing, press any of your tiles to ring your phone, even if the ringer is off. That is just $69.99.

Next up…Belkin WeMo Insight Switch.  This is a small connected home device that looks like a regular outlet – but when connected to your home Wi-Fi can turn your lights or home electronics on or off, measure how much energy your electronics are using and even be set to turn on after dark for extra home security…all via an app. Belkin WeMo Insight Switch costs just $59.99

Finally Nest Protect. This keeps your pets safe while you’re away for short getaways. You can get alerts on your smartphone or tablet if carbon monoxide or smoke is detected – or if the batteries are running low. The Nest Protect has an industrial grade sensor, that differentiate between slow and fast-burning fires and its alarm can be silenced from your mobile device. Nest Protect runs just $99.99.

All of these devices are available at your nearest verizon store or verizonwireless.com

This podcast is brought to you by Verizon, which operates America’s most reliable wireless network, with more than 112 million retail connections nationwide.

OFF THE BEATEN PATH REPORT -

Jim reports on the Joyce Kilmer Memorial Forest

Jim says:

I just returned from the Roadtrek get- together in The Smoky’s.  I wanted to talk a bit about a great out of the way Hike we did. We led 7 or 8 or our RT friends on a short trip to a little know area called The Joyce Kilmer Memorial Forest.  You may recall a poem called ‘Trees’ by Joyce Kilmer that starts ‘I Think that I shall never see….. a poem lovely as a tree’.

This memorial forest was named in his honor. He was a poet, as well as an infrantry man that was killed in action in WW I.  The forest is located in Southwest North Carolina near Robbinsville.  It’s a beautiful mountain area and is where they film the TV show called ‘MoonShiners’ and as well as several major movies..

The forest reserve is about 4000 acres of virgin forest.  The only way to see this Memorial Forest is on foot.  The forest area has a great 2 mile ‘figure- eight’  hike.  The hike is through the old growth forest which is a journey back in time.  This section of forest has never logged and is a virgin forest. The Forest has many  very-large trees, some 10  in diameter which is about 30’  in circumference. Most of the large trees are Tulip Poplars.   The path crosses many small streams and wanders through the magnificent forest. We all had our cameras, and it was a photographers delight. You may have seen our photos posted on the Roadtrek Group Face Book forum.

The drive to the trail head was a gorgeous one thru the mountains just south of the Great Smoky Mountains NP. There was even a small shop on the side of the road that had dozens of wood carvings, and the local wood carver was even on site working on an ornate walking stick. It was pretty cool.

At the trail-head there is no visitor center, however, there is a nice memorial to Joyce Kilmer at the center of the figure 8 hike.

There were 10-12 parking sports at the trail head and we had 3 Roadtreks parked in a row. There are also a couple of picnic tables at the trail head, so after we all took a 2 hour photography hike we had an impromptu lunch. We popped out a grill from one of our Roadtrek, and cooked hot dogs with all the fixin’s.   pulled condiments, snacks and sides from each of our Roadtreks .   A great end to a great hike.

By The way,  for those of you that tow a motorcycle with your Roadtrek, there is great motorcycle drive a few miles away. It’s the famous  Trail of the Dragon with 318  curves over just 11 miles.

I don’t think I’ll try that in our Roadtrek

This part of the podcast is brought to you by AllStays - the Internets #1 RV and camping app since 2010

INTERVIEW OF THE WEEK – Shane Pena

Every RVer has a story, Men RV newbie Shane Pena, who just made his first trip in his brand new motorhome – a 5,000 mile roundtrip. It was his very first time in an RV. Shane shares his experience in this week’s featured interview, which includes outrunning a tornado in Texas.

Direct download: RT94.mp3
Category:Travel -- posted at: 9:05pm EDT

In this episode of the Roadtreking RV Podcast we share some great stories from a veteran ranger who has served in National Parks across the country.

Jim Burnett is my guest and he shares some fascinating stories about life in the parks and gives us a first hand look at what being a ranger is like. He’s also the author of two great books -  “Hey Ranger!,” True Tales of Humor & Misadventure from the Great Outdoors and “Hey Ranger!, 2,”  with lots more fun stories.

Plus we have reader and listener questions and comments, RV news, tech tips and much more. Scroll down for show note details and resources and click the player below to start listening. When you see a time code hyperlink, you can click it to jump directly to that segment of the podcast.

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Show Notes for Episode #93 June 22, 2016 of Roadtreking - The RV Lifestyle Podcast:

This episode is recorded from our Roadtreking Great Smoky Nountains National park Photo Safaris. With about 65 Roadtrekers, Jennifer and Mike are here for lots of hiking and exploring in a park that covers 522,427 acres, divided almost evenly between the states of North Carolina and Tennessee.

The Great Smoky Mountains National Park is America’s most popular national park. It gets over 10 million visitors a year. Second most popular is Grand Canyon, which doesn’t even get half that much.

We are all staying at the Flaming Arrow Campground near Cherokee, NC

In the national park itself, there are 10 campgrounds, with 1,000 total spots. They are booked up months in advance, though, and every year they record more than a quarter of a million camper nights.

JENNIFER'S TIP OF THE WEEK

This week’s tip has to do with hydration and outdoor exertion. Down here in the Smoky Mountains, lots of our Roadtreking photo safaris campers are doing lots of hiking this week. But this tip applies to everyone, especially those doing fairly strenuous exercise in the warm summer months.

Here in North Carolina in the Smokies, the daytime temperatures this week are in the nineties.

That means dehydration can hit very fast.

Never hike, even for short distances, without carrying water.

Everyone is different, but a general guideline is while hiking and doing prolonged exercise outside, you need to take in about 4 to 6 ounces every 20 minutes or so. Better to sip a little frequently than a lot every few hours.

We usually add a couple of water bottles into the mesh pockets on the outside of our backpack. For shorter hikes, we may just carry a water bottle.

A lot of serious hikers like to invest in a hydration bladder like a Camelback or one of those backpack-style water packs.

Water bottles are quicker to fill and clean, but can be more awkward to grab while hiking – depending on how they carried. So those hydration bladders are a good investment if you do a lot of hiking.

Generally, you want to be sipping water all during the hike. It’s easy to become dehydrated, especially if its hot and humid or you are at altitude. Watch out for the symptoms of dehydration - Dizziness, headache, fatigue, nausea and cramps.

Be sure and take breaks. Always wear a hat while hiking and take your time. Especially when the weather is hot.

Bottom line – drink early and often. Dehydration can have very serious consequences and lead to medical emergencies.

Drink up everyone!

The tip of the week is brought to you by Good Sam, the world's most popular RV organization, now celebrating its 50th year.

LISTENER QUESTIONS OF THE WEEK:

Listener Judy asks about how to find a manual for the used 1997 Roadtrek she just purchased. Mike refers her to http://www.roadtrek.com/support-contact#section-manuals on the Roadtrek corporate site, where she can download the manual she wants. Manuals for every year since 1987 can be found there.

A listener asks if it okay to run the television in the back for children while traveling? Absolutely, Mike answers, for as long as you want.

And listener Barbara passes a thank you to our RV Recipes editor Mary Jane Curry, who recently posted a recipe on the blog for making crab enchiladas in the convection oven

In our email this week, we received this letter from a reader:

I am curious if you had the same experience with your RV that I do. I have need of a repair and call around the Rv places to have repairs done but nobody wants to work on it. I had a few Rv places do some work on mine but wasn't very good and ripped me off when it came to the bill.

Mike notes this is the little discussed scandal, the big problem few talk about in the RV industry: The lack of RV service. Dealers have massive problems finding and retraining quality service techs. Thus, their service shops are way overbooked and scheduled, sometimes for well over a month out. Mike shares other feedback he’s had on this, as well as his own experience and challenges the industry to step up and begin a campaign to train and hire more service techs.

Sponsoring this part of the podcast is Van City RV in St. Louis, and their Partner Dealerships Creston RV in Kalispell, Montana, and Wagon Trail RV in Las Vegas. Bringing You the largest Inventory of class B’s from three locations.

RV BASIC TRAINING

As summer heats up, many are looking to buy a recreational vehicle (RV) to enjoy time with friends and family. For first time buyers, the options and considerations can be overwhelming.

Motorhome or trailer? Gas or diesel? What size would be best for me and my family and friends? The options are endless, so time should be spent doing homework before a purchase.

The Better Business Bureau offers a list of tips to make the buying experience and RV experience enjoyable as possible.This part of the podcast is brought to you by Campers Inn, the nation’s largest family-operated RV dealership with 15 locations on the East Coast 

This part of the podcast is brought to you by Campers Inn, the nation’s largest family-operated RV dealership with 15 locations on the East Coast Campers Inn RV is giving away The Ultimate Camping Package! The camping package includes a: propane grill, large cooler, 2 camping chairs, a two-person lazy river tube and more. A $500 value! Go towww.campersinn.com/roadtreking for your chance to win.  Promo code: camping. Winner will be announced Aug 1, 2016.

RV NEWS OF THE WEEK:

A National Park worker who asked to remain anonymous sent Mike the following note:

Please remind your readers how important it is to drive slowly through Teton park. Bear 399's new cub of year was killed by hit and run car. Illegal to not report. Within 12 hrs a female black bear was also killed and unreported. 399 cub was such an emotional impact some rangers and public where all crying. Truly a very sad day. Also a pregnant deer a few days prior was hit expelling her baby who was alive but they could not keep it alive. This is very hard on the employees in the park. Not to mention damage to vehicles.

Amazon is looking for temporary workers. Here’s a note sent us via the Family Motor Coach Association:

My name is Michael Cross and I want to tell you about a great opportunity!

Thanks for taking a moment to look at Amazon’s CamperForce program. I won’t take too much of your time.

Even if you have never been a work camper, you may find yourself thinking, “Hmmm … maybe.” I say this because I have known many people who have done just that. Amazon’s Camperforce is the only work camping they do and they do it because CamperForce is the best work camping opportunity out there. Pay starts at $10.75/hour plus time and 1/2 for overtime, plus a full-hookup site, a season completion bonus, and referral bonuses. With this level of compensation, you do the math: That is a lot of extra fuel, or Christmas presents, new satellite receiver … you know the list: it’s your list!

I was a work camper myself at one time, (still am at heart), and I took advantage of this opportunity. Now I am the Program Manager for the CamperForce Program working for Amazon full time. That’s how much I like the program!  For questions, you can reach us at camperforce@amazon.com.

 Camper leaves road in Vermont, flies 130 feet -– More proof on home wearing your seat belt can save your lfe. And an illustration on why you shouldn’t drive too long without taking a break.

This portion of the podcast is brought to you by Alde  the only name in heat that you need to know for your RV

TRAVELING TECH TIP: Hum

Verizon's Steve Van Dinter reports on a very handy device for your RV or family far called Hum. Aimed at teen drivers initially, it has great application for all of us, offering under the hood analysis and reports on our vehicle’s system performance and operating conditions.

And Mike has some apps to help with packing for your RV trips and other types of travel.

With summer officially here, chances are you will be travelling at some point.

Forgetting something or some things you need, however, can ruin a trip.

These apps can help manage and take the stress out of packing.

Packpoint is much more than a list app. Users input details such as length of stay along with planned activities – everything from working out and eating to going to the beach. The app then generates a list of what you should pack based on yout variables. And don’t worry, the list is fully customizable so it can be changed as needed. Packpoint is free and available for iOS and Android with premium services available for small charge.

Packing Pro might just be the most comprehensive packing app around. The app allows you to plan for multiple trips and people at the same time. It starts with a to-do list and continues with an essentials list, and has reminders for anything users might have to take care of during their trip – even stuff to do after it’s over. Packing Pro is $2.99 for iOS.

Travel List is a great choice for those who want a minimalist approach to packing. You create lists and check items off after packing– leaving a list only of what’s left to pack. Travel List also has customizable alerts, such as the one that can remind users to recharge camera batteries nightly. It can help manage multiple trips in the works. Travel List is $1.99 for iOS.

OFF THE BEATEN PATH REPORT -  Symmes Chapel

By Tom Burkett

We know some of our fellow Roadtrekers are in North Carolina round about now.  We’d like to clue you in to one of our favorite mountain sights that you’re unlikely to find on a map.  Near Cleveland, South Carolina you’ll find YMCA Camp Greenville within the bounds of the Mountain Bridge Wilderness Area.  The camp occupies 1600 mountain acres at 3200 feet, and has hiking trails and a spectacular waterfall.  What makes it especially worth a visit, though, is Symmes Chapel.  The chapel was originally built by Fred Symmes in 1941.  The open air structure sits on a cliff overlooking the mountains.

Last time we were there it was just after sunrise on an April morning, and all the valleys below us were filled with morning fog.  Only the tops of the ridges were visible and the entire vista was a monochromatic gray.  As the sun peeked up above the horizon the ridges began to show their actual green color and the fog slowly lifted.  Valleys were exposed as the fog dissipated, and the blue-green ridges rolled off to the east as far as the eye could see.

About fifty people were there by the time we left; some were yMCA campers, others were coming for an early morning church service.  The large, simple wooden cross at the front of the chapel lent a sacred air to the view and the experience.  The chapel was surrounded with vibrant azaleas, and spring wildflowers crowded the roadside as we drove down the hill and back to our campground in the Pisgah National Forest.

If you’re going, call first to be sure the chapel isn’t reserved for a wedding or some other event.  Most fall weekends are booked because of the spectacular color display, but even then it’s possible to find a time to stop by.  Sunrise is particularly spectacular, as the chapel faces east.

Nearby, the town of Brevard hosts a first-rate weekly farmers market and is full of fun and interesting shops, restaurants, and special events.  There’s ample camping (mostly campgrounds) in the nearby national forests.  US 276 through the Pisgah Forest is named the Forest Heritage Scenic Byway.  It passes by a very good visitor cente and a number of interesting sites, but we’ll save those for another report.

The mountains of the Carolinas are chockablock with things to do and see.  Meet interesting people, hear mountain music, get to know the inspiring and sometimes sad stories of the lives lived here in the last century.  Take your time and don’t miss a bit of it.  Happy travels!

This part of the podcast is brought to you by AllStays - the Internets #1 RV and camping app since 2010

INTERVIEW OF THE WEEK - Jim Burnett

Jim Burnett, retired ranger with the National Parks Service and author of two great books about his 30 years of service in parks across the country.

We met Jim and his wonderful wife Viola at our Roadtreking gathering in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. The couple, now retired, lives nearby and Jm came over to share some of his stories wth our group.

Jim has written “Hey Ranger!,” True Tales of Humor & Misadventure from the Great Outdoors and “Hey Ranger!, 2” More True Tales of Humor & Misadventure from the Great Outdoors. These books teach as they entertain, with tales of boat ramp misadventures, lost Afghani campers, encounters with wild animals, dumb crooks, and more. One chapter, "Tales from the Wild Side," brings together unusual incidents from National Park Service reports, and the concluding essay, "Don't Be a Victim of Your Vacation," advises visitors on how to avoid being a story on the evening news.

They really give us behind-the-scenes look. Many people envy the lives of rangers who live and work in national parks. Through insights into what that job can really entail, the book will appeal both to ranger "wannabees" and rangers alike, as well as to their families and friends and everyone who loves America's National Parks.

Please Subscribe and Give Us a Rating and Review!

Many listeners are asking how they can subscribe, review and rate the Roadtreking Podcast on iTunes. With a new podcast like this, those reviews and ratings are really important to be able to show well in the iTunes listings. So if you can, I’d sure appreciate it if you’d subscribe and leave me your review.

Here’s how:

How to subscribe, rate and review a podcast

First, open up the iTunes app on your computer or mobile device. Click on Podcasts up on the top
> From the iTunes Podcasts page, use the “Search Store” field up at the top right corner of the page. Type in Mike Wendland or Roadtreking RV Podcast.
> Click on the logo image of the Roadtreking RV Podcast on the search return page
> From there (see photo above), you can…

1) Subscribe

2) Choose and Click on a star (1-5) that reflects your rating. Five stars means you really like it, one star not so much.

3) Leave a written review.

Thanks to all for the kind reviews we’ve received so far. That got us noticed by Apple/iTunes as “New and Noteworthy.” I appreciate every review!

And remember, you can appear in future episodes. Ask a question or voice your comments about RV topics by clicking the Leave Voicemail tab on the right side of this page here at Roadtreking.com. You can then use the microphone on your computer to record your words.

Direct download: RT93.mp3
Category:Travel -- posted at: 3:38pm EDT

Episode 92: The Roads Less Traveled

It's a sad fact that so many RVers travel so fast that they miss so much.

That's because they travel the interstates, where the country whizzes past in a blur. In this episode of Roadtreing: The RV Lifestyle Podcast, we suggest a better way, through the backroads, the two lane state and county highways. In the interview segment towards the end of the program, Mike interviews RVers Jerry Pava, who reveals how he makes sure he spends as little time as possible on the Interstate Then, in an off-the-beaten-path report, Tom and Patti Burkett take us to Western Oklahoma and an event far from the Interstate that is worth traveling to just to getthe T-Shirt.

Plus your comments, questions and lots of tips.Scroll down for show note details and resources and click the player below to start listening. When you see a time code hyperlink, you can click it to jump directly to that segment of the podcast.

Show Notes for Episode #92 June 15, 2016 of Roadtreking - The RV Lifestyle Podcast:

JENNIFER'S TIP OF THE WEEK

This week’s tip is a follow up to the suggestion I made last week about using Zip Lock bags to store all sorts of stuff, from food to spare parts to things like cereal which can be emptied out of those big bulky boxes and stored in much less space.

A listener named Diane offers up an alternative suggestion.

The system Diane suggested is called Thrifty Vac. It seals all kinds of foods in vacuum bags.. It is very inexpensive, less that $2 . The bags cost about 17-cents each. I’ll put a link on the shownotes page for this episode at Roadtreking-dot-com-forward slash-92.

If you have a tip you’d like to share with our RVing audience, use the “Send Voicemail” link on the right side of the Roadtreking.com blog. You can use the built-in microphone on your computer or smartphone to record the tip and send it directly to me. You can also reach me at Jennifer@roadtreking com

The tip of the week is brought to you by Good Sam, the world's most popular RV organization, now celebrating its 50th year.

LISTENER QUESTIONS OF THE WEEK:

===Maribeth asks about hooking her RV up to the house current while its parked in her driveway. Mike recommends a 30 AMP system, especially if she wasn’t to run her air conditioning. For the fridge and to charge the house batteries, the normal house system of 20 Amps will work but you will not be able to run the same amount of appliances inside the RV as you could if you were getting power from a 30A or, for the bigger RVs, a 50 A system

===Ann asks about the proper tire pressure in her RV. She checked the door post panels but found a suggestion on the Internet that recommended different settings.

The recommended maximum inflation pressures for your tires are indicated on the certification label or in your owner's manual. Since RVs can be loaded with many different configurations, the load on each tire will vary. For this reason, actual air pressure required should be determined based on the load on each individual tire. Inflation pressure should be adjusted to handle the tire carrying the heaviest load, and all tires on the axle should be adjusted to this standard.

Each manufacturer provides load and inflation tables specific to their products to help you determine the correct tire inflation pressure for your vehicle's loading.

Under inflation brings a higher risk of susceptibility to damage due to road hazards, reduces casing durability, and causes a loss in fuel economy, plus uneven or irregular tire wear. Severe or prolonged underinflation brings about an increased risk of tread

It's a common practice for RV owners to lower tire pressure in their search for a smoother ride. This is not only dangerous, it's relatively ineffective, as the difference in ride quality is not significant. When minimum inflation pressure requirements are not met, tire durability and optimum operating conditions are compromised. Tire inflation pressure should always meet at least the minimum guidelines for vehicle weight.

Check your tires' air pressures at least once a month, before each trip and each morning you drive during a trip. Tire pressure should be checked cold, or before you have driven that day, as tire pressure ratings have been designed with typical running heat/pressure build-up in mind. Remember to check the air pressures of the inside tires in dual fitments and make sure the valves and caps are free of dirt and moisture. Check http://www.goodyearrvtires.com/tire-inflation-loading.aspx for more info

===Craig asks about the best portable grill for his RV. Mike shares what he has, and news of a new one called the Volcano Grill… a three in one grill that can cook with propane, charcoal or wood…plus it converts into a small campfire. $149 on Amazon.

Mike also uses a small Coleman Camp Propane Grill and Stove and the GoSun Solar cooker.

Sponsoring this part of the podcast is Van City RV in St. Louis, and their Partner Dealerships Creston RV in Kalispell, Montana, and Wagon Trail RV in Las Vegas. Bringing You the largest Inventory of class B’s from three locations.

RV BASIC TRAINING

 We’ve talked about Class A motorhomes, travel trailer and now, in this week’s edition of RV Basic Training, what you need to know about buying a Class B RV, or camper van, as they are typically called.

Buying an RV is perhaps the second biggest purchase most of us will make next to our house. In some cases, with kids grown and newly retired from our jobs, it becomes our house as more and more people embrace the fulltiming style of a life on wheels.

And these days, Type B RVs seem to be at the top of the motorhome popularity chart. Many who bought larger Type A or C motorhomes are downsizing, or “rightsizing,” as some call it, for the more mobile and maneuverable Type B RV style campervan motorhome.

For one thing, new retirees are coming into the marketplace every day. And today’s retirees are generally healthier and more active than those who came before. The first baby boomers turned 65 three years ago. According to a Social Security agency report, over the next two decades, nearly 80 million Americans will become eligible for Social Security benefits, more than 10,000 per day.

To find out, we crowdsourced the question, asking current Type B owners, members of our very active Roadtreking Facebook Group. They are the true experts, whose collective wisdom is more reliable and real world than any of the pie in the sky promises you’ll get from commission hungry RV salemen.

Here’s a link to the questions you should ask - http://roadtreking.com/choosing-a-class-b-rv/

This part of the podcast is brought to you by Campers Inn, the nation’s largest family-operated RV dealership with 15 locations on the East Coast 

This part of the podcast is brought to you by Campers Inn, the nation’s largest family-operated RV dealership with 15 locations on the East Coast Campers Inn RV is giving away The Ultimate Camping Package! The camping package includes a: propane grill, large cooler, 2 camping chairs, a two-person lazy river tube and more. A $500 value! Go to www.campersinn.com/roadtreking for your chance to win.  Promo code: camping. Winner will be announced Aug 1, 2016.

RV NEWS OF THE WEEK:

 Man dies when wind microburst tosses his RV 40 feet – A man died in southern Colorado Sunday after a microburst apparently threw his RV trailer about 40 feet, according to the Otero County Sheriff's Office. The 50-year-old man was killed near Highway 194 on County Road 33, which is about 15 miles from La Junta. The man's name has not been released, pending an autopsy and notification of family. The Sheriff's Office said deputies and the National Weather Service are investigating the death.

EverGreen RV shuts down - EverGreen Recreational Vehicles in Middlebury, at one time one of the fastest-growing RV companies in the nation, has closed its doors, leaving hundreds of employees out of work. Employees and county officials said EverGreen shut down its operations on Friday.The plant grounds at 10758 C.R. 2, just north of the Indiana Toll Road, were mostly empty Friday afternoon with almost no cars in the parking lot.The company employed about 400 people in Middlebury who are now out of a job.

Woman Pleads Guilty to Defacing Rocks at National Parks - - A San Diego woman who painted and drew on treasured natural rock formations at national parks across the West and shared her work on social media pleaded guilty Monday to defacing government property. Casey Nocket, 23, pleaded guilty in a federal court in Fresno, California to seven misdemeanors for the autumn 2014 painting spree at seven national parks including Yosemite in California and Zion in Utah. She also admitted to defacing rocks at Crater Lake National Park in Oregon and Rocky Mountain National Park in Colorado.

This portion of the podcast is brought to you by Alde  the only name in heat that you need to know for your RV

TRAVELING TECH TIP:

Verizon's Steve Van Dinter reports on Mobile Payments and why using this new way of paying for goods is safe, reliable and efficient.

Mike’s Apps of the week

When it comes to summer fun, nothing beats a perfect meal from the grill – just as a cookout failure can be disastrous. RVers love cooking out and I have three apps to help you improve your chances of a successful barbecue.

The Pit Pal BBQ App adds a bit of science to the barbecue process. Grillers log details about each cook like, temperature, wood type, charcoal, gas and weather. There are more variables from food type and weight sauce, rub and more. The benefit of having all this info is to allow for instant access to what works and what doesn’t. The app is free for iOS and Android with in-app purchases available to add more functions.

The Grill It app offers dozens of great recipes for barbecue fans. Grill It also offers tips on how to marinate and grill certain kinds and cuts of food. The easy-to-navigate app includes information on seven categories, from beef and lamb to poultry, pork, and burgers. The app is 99 cents for iOS and Android.

Omaha Steaks Steak Time is limited to – you guessed it – steaks. The app features recipes for nearly every cut of steak and even has a so-called “steak 101” section to help users understand everything they ever wanted to know about grilling steak. Perhaps the coolest part of this app is the steak timer that includes times multiple steaks on the grill independently so everyone is happy. The app is free for iOS.

This podcast is brought to you by Verizon, which operates America’s most reliable wireless network, with more than 112 million retail connections nationwide.

OFF THE BEATEN PATH REPORT -   Western Oklahoma

Tom and Patii Burkett report on Beaver, OK and the International Cow Chip Throwing Championship, which bills itself as the Cow Chip Throwing Capital of the World.

This part of the podcast is brought to you by AllStays - the Internets #1 RV and camping app since 2010

INTERVIEW OF THE WEEK - staying off the interstates

Mike interviews an RVer named Jerry Pavlat, who shares how he traveled backroads on a recent coast to coast RV trip.

 

 

Direct download: RT92.mp3
Category:Travel -- posted at: 7:30pm EDT

This week, we talk about how to find free or very cheap sites in National Forests and we offer up some major motivation about why you need to get out there RVing.

We also report on a study that shows one of the top of the list regrets Baby Boomers have is not traveling more. And we note how the kind of travel that RVing offers builds lasting memories and true contentment. Plus listener questions, comments, lots of tips and an of-the-beaten-path report.

Scroll down for show note details and resources and click the player below to start listening. When you see a time code hyperlink, you can click it to jump directly to that segment of the podcast.

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Show Notes for Episode #91 June 8 2016 of Roadtreking - The RV Lifestyle Podcast

JENNIFER'S TIP OF THE WEEK

Space is always at a premium in an RV so finding ways to maximize storage but take up less room at the same time is quite the balancing act.

That’s where Zip Lock Bags come in so handy.

Most of us use them for things like sandwiches. And that’s good.

But in the RV, we use them for lots more.

In the fridge, I use them for leftovers, for veggies, for premade meals. They pack well and don’t roll around or rattle.

But in our pantry, they’re great for storing things like cereal and dry goods and things that come with lots of packaging, in big boxes that take up lots of space.

Just empty the box into a baggie. You’ve instantly saved at lots of space. And because they seal up tight, things stay fresher than when stored in an open box.

Mike uses Zip Lock bags to hold screws, fuses, cables, spare latches for the cabinet doors and various maintenance parts.

Because the bags are clear, you instantly know what’s inside. And they come in different sizes.

Zip Lock Bags make great space savers!

Do you have a tip that we should share on the podcast? Use the Leave Voicemail link on the right side of the screen to send it in.

I love hearing from you!

The tip of the week is brought to you by Good Sam, the world’s most popular RV organization, now celebrating its 50thyear.

LISTENER QUESTIONS OF THE WEEK:

Listener Jan has a question about the piece of wood that connects the lower part of the two rear sofa beds at the back of a Roadtrek. Mike and Jennifer share their experience on how to keep it from falling down.

Gina asks about the app Roadside America and what mobile platforms it worked on. Alas, as Mike says, it’s only for iOS devices, not Android. The app helps users find all of the oddities across the United States and Canada, from giant twine balls to other off-the-wall attractions like the Cathedral of Junk in Austin, Texas. Search for attractions nearby, where headed – even by theme. The Roadside America app delivers a short description, address, and directions. The app is $2.99 for iOS with in-app purchases available to expand capabilities.

By email, reader Loretta asks: Hi!  We are not new to camping, but new to Roadtreking:)  we have a small dog that we need to check on with our iPad using ATT cell data.  Do you know of a compatible 'spy' camera?  I have read so many descriptions on different make cameras, but they always want you to use Wifi - which we will not have on the road.Thanks so much! Loretta

Mike shares his solution, Canary, noting that all remote monitoring systems DO require Wi-Fi. But her iPad can set up its own hotspot, which in turn can be used by Canary.

The Canary device works through a free app and it provides live, wide angle streaming video and audio. We set it up before we leave the RV and we can use our smartphones to check up on what’s happening and how Bo is doing from anywhere.

Something else we really like about the Canary: It provides real time readouts of the temperature, humidity and air quality so we can be sure the AC is working.

The cost is $200. There are premium fees that you can upgrade to that archives your video, a feature more suited to fulltime use in a fixed residence. Since we are in an RV and only use the Canary from time to time while traveling, I’ll stick with the free service for a while. The Canary is available online at Amazon and at most big box stores.

Sponsoring this part of the podcast is Van City RV in St. Louis, and their Partner Dealerships Creston RV in Kalispell, Montana, and Wagon Trail RV in Las Vegas. Bringing You the largest Inventory of class B’s from three locations.

RV BASIC TRAINING

How to find free or very cheap places to stay in National Forest Campgrounds

This part of the podcast is brought to you by Campers Inn, the nation’s largest family-operated RV dealership with 15 locations on the East Coast. Campers Inn RV is giving away The Ultimate Camping Package! The camping package includes a: propane grill, large cooler, 2 camping chairs, a two-person lazy river tube and more. A $500 value! Go to www.campersinn.com/roadtreking for your chance to win.  Promo code: camping. Winner will be announced Aug 1, 2016.

RV NEWS OF THE WEEK:

 National Park Service Plans rate hikes, other charges for Great Smoky Mountains National ParkThanks to reader Ian, who sends us the following note:

Mike , I know you are heading to the Smokies for a photo shoot in a few weeks. Are you aware of the recent proposals from the NPS regarding the GSMNP? Attached is a link to the proposal, it's on their website. They will be accepting comments till the 27th of this month. Maybe you could make folks aware of the proposal. Personally, fee increase is probably acceptable. The reservation issue is another whole issue. Charging $10 just to make the reservation is insane. Also at least some sites need to be left open for a first come - first serve basis. Especially in the more remote campgrounds. Maybe you could make folks aware of these proposals before the Park Service stops accepting comments and input. Thanks, Ian

Did a bear attack a woman camper in Ohio? An Ohio couple camping early Friday morning told investigators they were attacked by a large bear but fought back with a machete. Investigators found no evidence of a bear.

Major regret for older people? Not traveling more  Now is the time to buy an RV and get out there!

This portion of the podcast is brought to you by Alde  the only name in heat that you need to know for your RV

TRAVELING TECH TIP:

Verizon's Steve Van Dinter reports on HD Voice, a major new quality upgrade to mobile phone audio.

Meanwhile, Mike has some fun apps that let you share those RV travel memories:

Steller lets you upload photos and videos and type in text to create a mobile storybook experience – and can all be done on an iPhone. You can edit your stories before publishing them and then share on social networks like Facebook and Twitter. Readers flip through photos, videos, and text pages as if reading an e-book. The app is free for iOS.

Storehouse also allows users to import photos and videos from sources like an iPhone’s Camera Roll or other places like Instagram, Flickr, Dropbox, and Lightroom. You can’t add text to individual photos like with Steller, but it has more design options The app is free for iOS.

Android users should consider Storyo. The customizable app makes chronicling life easy by automatically searching your photos for set times or locations. Storyo also quickly combines video from the Internet along with maps, and titles to create stories that can then be shared with others. The app is free.

It’s easy to share the storybooks you create with these apps with friends and family.

Here’s one I did on a beachfront camping spot we just visited in Florida.

This podcast is brought to you by Verizon, which operates America’s most reliable wireless network, with more than 112 million retail connections nationwide.

OFF THE BEATEN PATH REPORT -  Northwestern Lower Michigan

Ari Adler takes us to Michigan’s Northwestern coastline to a place called the Tunnel of Trees. See http://roadtreking.com/guest-post-off-beaten-path-northwestern-lower-michigan/

 

 

Direct download: RT91.mp3
Category:Travel -- posted at: 4:01pm EDT

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